Books

What Happens at Comic Con …

… get’s broadcast all over the world, so behave yourself!
Crank the kid-bot introduces bio-kids to the "Hub's Adventures" books.

Crank the kid-bot introduces bio-kids to the “Hub’s Adventures” books.

Business has definitely taken me away from blogging the last few weeks. Some of you may not know that my “day job” is as a sales representative for an educational book distributor. It’s a great job, visiting school librarians and teachers every day! The school year has already started in our region and I have been on the streets – and the road – and away from my leisure time writing.

Last weekend, though, I broke away to Chicago for the Wizard World Comic Con. We had a great weekend, introducing our sixth-grader robot, Crank, to hundreds of kids and selling and signing over 175 books.

A comic con is a great, friendly atmosphere with dozens of artists and retailers (I think I counted 10 full-scale comic book stores set up in the exhibit hall) and thousands of participants rolling through – some costumed, some sightseeing, some looking for that special comic/sci-fi/horror-related item. I had an artist’s table with all my youth books – including the newly released “Hub’s Adventures” books, hot off the press for the event.

The green robot you see in the photo above was built by a sculptor friend based on my illustrator’s depiction of my sixth-grader robot character in “Hub’s Adventures.” He was a big hit with the kids, introducing them to stories of the future where humans and robots will be best friends.

A spider-man stopped by to get some "Hub's Adventures" books!

A spider-man stopped by to get some “Hub’s Adventures” books!

I also found a very robust market for my books – the perfect market for a guy with my temperament. I love meeting people, especially kids interested in reading. Many parents bought books for their kids – and some kids spent their show budgets on my books! I’m very grateful for all the attention and for the purchases, which make more books and more show appearances possible.

The Delphi Trilogy books sold very well, too, introducing teen readers to the first two books in advance of Book III’s release October 1.

Next, I plan to be at the Wizard World in Nashville (a little closer to home) September 26-28. I look forward to meeting more readers there and at other comic cons.

 

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 great things about being at comic con:

  1. People assume my unfashionable clothes are some kind of costume.
  2. I can yell, “Look! It’s Spiderman!” and no one calls the cops on me.
  3. All day long I get to pretend I’m living in an A-ha music video with other cartoon characters.

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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THE DELPHI REVELATION: Book III of The Delphi Trilogy available October 2014!
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The Burger is Back!

Where has my blog – Brain Burgers – been for the last few weeks? Well, where the brain goes the burger goes, too.
Brain Burger on a Break: Writing; Editing; Working; Traveling; Speaking.

Brain Burgers on a Break: Writing; Editing; Working; Traveling; Speaking.

Someone asked YA author Rick Riordan on Twitter “Why don’t you blog?” He tweeted something like, “If I blog I won’t have as much time to write books.” I know what he means. Writing is work and, because there’s no clock to punch or boss to shake their head in disapproval, a lot of things can get in the way. Blogging is a little bit of work, too – and a lot of things get in the way.

Here’s what I’ve been up to:

I’ve been writing a lot. Over the winter and into spring, I wrote three books on contract that should be coming out next year. I also wrote the first couple of drafts of the last Delphi Trilogy book, titled THE DELPHI REVELATION. Then over the last couple of weeks I wrote a short novel that I’m thinking of expanding into a bigger novel (if my agent likes it).

Editing is a big part of writing – often more work than writing that first draft. [Hint to aspiring writers: I say there are 3 stages of a manuscript – Done; Right; Good. Maybe I’ll burger on that sometime soon ;)] So, editing on three books plus the Delphi III draft has taken a lot of time. But it’s an absolutely necessary part of the process. No book comes out right the first time. Heaven help me, though, I hope I’m getting better and will need a little less editing as time goes on.

I started a new job in January that I love and the work fits me perfectly. I visit school librarians and sell books for a very well-respected company. Meeting with dozens – if not hundreds – of librarians this year alone has been great. Come fall, I want to start giving them a quick interview and posting their answers on Facebook, Twitter, and here on Brain Burgers. I love those librarians!

Traveling is part of that job because I cover a good-sized territory here around the Mountain Empire. I like a good road trip, so hopping in the car and going a couple of days a week is always fun. But it does take a lot of time – time I might otherwise be writing or blogging. So, there’s that.

I spoke to three groups of 100+ students at Delphi Middle/High School.

I’m one of those weirdos who likes speaking in public. (At Delphi Middle/High School in April.)

Some of that traveling has been for speaking engagements and author visits with schools and libraries. The highlight of the year so far was my visit with the school and library at Delphi, Indiana in April. You read about it in my post “Home to Delphi”. But that’s certainly not all for the year. I’ve got a few author visits lined up with public libraries for the summer. I’m one of those weirdos who loves speaking to an audience, so don’t fret for me. In fact, if you’ve got anything you’ve always wanted to say in front of a large audience but have been afraid to, send it to me and I’ll see if I can slip it it.

So, yeah, I plan to start blogging again regularly, if you’ll keep sharing your time and attention with me. Blogs, like books, are meant to be read. So keep I’ll Brain, you Burger, and we’ll keep this thing rolling.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 reasons to start reading Brain Burgers again:

  1. No trans fats.
  2. If you don’t give the author your attention he’ll just go get attention on the street – and none of us wants that.
  3. You can tell everyone you found a burger that’s calorie-free.

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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The Product of Failure

The gift of struggle in learning – and how getting it wrong can actually pay off.
Struggle now can pay off later - he hopes ...

Struggle now can pay off later … he hopes.

A superb article by education writer Annie Murphy Paul caught my attention this week – When, And How, To Let Learners Struggle. Murphy Paul reports on a study published in the Journal of the Learning Sciences called “Designing for Productive Failure” that shows mind-bending results.

In the study, two groups of kids were given a mathematical problem to solve – and it might surprise you to learn that the group who got the answer right scored lower when tested on “what they learned” than the kids who got the answer wrong!

How can this be? It’s in the experience the kids had – not the answer they reached. Group 1 was given extensive support by a teacher and ultimately led to the correct answer. I’ll bet they felt pretty good about it.

Group 2, on the other hand, was “… directed to solve the same problems by collaborating with one another, absent any prompts from their instructor. … in the course of trying to do so, they generated a lot of ideas about the nature of the problems and about what potential solutions would look like. And when the two groups were tested on what they’d learned, the second group ‘significantly outperformed’ the first.” I wonder if the kids were as surprised as I am.

Reminds me of the axiom that if you help a butterfly emerge from its chrysalis, you rob it of the wall-busting strength it must develop to survive in the outside world.

I’m assuming that even though Group 2 was not given significant help from their teacher, it’s likely that their learning environment was overall supportive and healthy. If an adult had been standing by blowing a whistle and shouting insults every time Group 2 went “offtrack,” you can imagine the kind of confusion and self-mistrust those kids might have developed. Such a negative feedback environment might have pushed the “what they learned” score down significantly. So, environment must matter too.

The point of the “productive failure” observation is to point out how kids can learn confidence in their creativity and thinking skills even if the exact correct answers to questions and problems elude them. (A reflection on some Common Core methods here?)

It goes for adults too. I have a friend in business who says, “Fail fast.” In other words: We know we’re going to fail on some levels. It’s an experience we must have to get smarter and sharper and ultimately become successful. So get through the failing process as quickly as possible and get on to the success. You can’t do that unless you have a “healthy” attitude toward failure.

I struggled a lot with learning as a youth. I think that, unfortunately, I had the idea that failure was permanent. (Anyone else out there have a negative feedback environment?) As a curious and driven adult, it’s taken me years of inside work and outside experience to befriend failure and learn from it. The results: more self-trust; the ability to laugh at myself when I “fail”; the ability to work quickly through the process of grief over bad experiences; the overall sense that whatever “this” is, it’s not permanent; a sense of ultimate success through building on repeated “failures.”

I’m not happy about my childhood learning struggles, but I do see the value in the creative analysis of subjects and problems that I developed as a result. Author Simon Sinek says that the “survival” skills we develop as children to make up for our deficiencies become our greatest assets as adults. In our youthful creativity we develop personal ways of learning, working, and communicating which are unique to the individual – and much needed by the world – later in life.

I’ve always struggled to some degree with reading – but I somehow became an author! I’ve come to believe that one of the things that makes me an effective writer is the fact that I read slowly, trying not to miss any of the content, and have unconsciously picked up on a lot more information about writing style, grammar, voice, etc.

So, maybe the trade-off is worth it. The earlier we understand the true nature of “failure” and befriend it, the better off we can be throughout the rest of our lives – whenever the rest of our lives begins.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 other ways failure makes the world better:

  1. You think those geniuses got the Twinky right on the first try? Yum!
  2. I’ve never heard someone say, “If at first you don’t succeed … ah, forget it!”
  3. We never would have had all those iPhone 1 jokes to laugh at.

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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Duking it Out

Who’ll take the belt – upstart digital or good ol’ print?
Digital and print go toe-to-toe on the shifting canvas of today's market.

Digital and print go toe-to-toe on the shifting canvas of today’s market.

A couple of articles grabbed my attention this week – just for seeming so different from each other.

The Christian Science Monitor posted a story about America’s first bookless library. You read that right – a library without books in San Antonio, TX is packing the patrons in from around town and around the world. I’m not a “this changes everything” kind of guy, but “… stocked with 10,000 e-books, 500 e-readers, 48 computers, and 20 iPads and laptops, the $2.3 million library has been compared countless times to an Apple Store with its rows of glossy devices.” The Biblio-Tech definitely looks like the future we were promised in the early-80’s of a future paperless society.

It’s weird because, even though I’ve always been fascinated by the concept of a paperless society, when I think of libraries, I get images of the Library at Alexandria or Green Town’s library in Ray Bradbury’s “Something Wicked This Way Comes” (which I picture as a classic Carnegie library). These are buildings stocked with books. Bookie-books. Paper books!

But there’s good news for the old champ, because PBS reports that “Americans prefer print books over e-books” based on recent Pew Research polls. Only three in ten adults polled read an e-book in the past year, while seven in ten read a book in paper. The amazing thing is that half of those adults polled own a tablet or e-reader on which they could read e-books, but they still prefer paper. So maybe Alexandria and Green Town will stay in the bookie-book business.

Elephant books.

Elephant books.

Yes, there’s an elephant in the room. How are the kids reading? Scholastic reports that kids are reading e-books, but still overwhelmingly prefer print books. In my work writing, promoting, and selling youth books, I’m learning that e-books are becoming more relevant but print books don’t seem to be going anywhere. I remember as kid liking the idea of owning a book (and I didn’t love reading back then). According to librarians and teachers, this hasn’t changed. Kids like books.

Holding and owning a book is still important to the little ones – and, apparently, the big ones too. So let’s not do the digital count on the old hardcover pug yet.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 differences between an all-digital library and an all-print library:

  1. You can’t get electrocuted spilling coffee on a print book.
  2. Turning out the lights in an all-print library = no more reading.
  3. Read the pages or read the pixels – your choice.

SPREAD THE CONSPIRACY – GET “THE DELPHI DECEPTION: BOOK II OF THE DELPHI TRILOGY” NOW!

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Third Grade Reluctant Reader Blues

How third grade can make reading a real drag!

A portrait of the blogger as a young reader? Pretty close!

A portrait of the blogger as a young reader? Pretty close!

In an article posted at Time: Ideas, education journalist and author Anne Murphy Paul has identified one of the root causes of a condition that inevitably becomes the scourge of middle schoolers’ parents and teachers – reluctant reading.

Would you believe it starts in third grade?

Paul points out that this is the pivotal time in education when reading materials shift from easy subject matter pieces designed to help kids learn to read to more complex materials developed with the expectation of reading aptitude – read to learn. While Paul’s article brings to light the overall academic difficulties in later grades for kids who struggle with third grade reading comprehension, the following line grabbed my attention:

“While their more skilled classmates are amassing knowledge and learning new words from context, poor readers may begin to avoid reading out of frustration.”

This makes a lot of sense to me. As a childhood reluctant reader myself, I didn’t lack the innate intelligence and curiosity needed for learning. Somehow, though, I must have failed to make the transition from “learning to read to reading to learn.” My frustration with increasingly complex reading material and my slow reading speed, combined with the self-esteem drop from falling behind my classmates, no doubt turned me off to reading for learning and entertainment and soured me on education in general.

By the way, my fourth-grade self didn’t use those words to describe my reading difficulties. He was saying things like: “Reading is dumb”; “Reading is boring”; “Let’s go watch ‘The Six-million Dollar Man’ on TV instead!”  (I hear the same sentiment from teens – especially boys – when I have book-based events with them.)

Why is this third grade reading transition so hugely important? Because, as Paul’s article says, “A study … released last year by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, found that third-graders who lack proficiency in reading are four times more likely to become high school dropouts.” I added the emphasis there because … FOUR TIMES MORE LIKELY TO DROP OUT! WHAT?! Does this go beyond alarming and into crisis territory?

In our society, basic education becomes more important all the time. Minimum-wage, entry-level jobs nowadays often require a high school diploma or GED – even the military, which when I was a kid was always a viable option for dropouts. But a kid who can’t read well – or doesn’t want to – bears the greatest disadvantage in school and is much more likely to give up and leave without even the most basic employment qualification.

I was one of those kids who fell behind, hated reading, and went into a dropout spiral. In tenth grade a dedicated teacher inspired me to pull myself out of it and I managed to clear the challenges of senior high. Most reluctant readers don’t recover the way I did and the ripples into the rest of their lives can be devastating.

While some well-intentioned states are trying to legislate reading comprehension by holding laggard readers back a grade, personalized intervention and encouragement seems to be the best remedy. One of the R’s in my R.E.A.D.E.R. tips is “(be a) Reading role model: Get caught reading – to, with, and by your kids.” Nothing seems more effective in helping kids develop good reading habits and enjoyment as reading to them and with them. (Coincidentally, that teacher who inspired me to rescue my education had a lot of reading aloud and follow-along group reading in his classes.)

Personally, I hate to see any kid miss the chance to enrich their lives through education. I credit most of my personal development to my ability and willingness to read, a skill and love that has allowed me to connect with the very kids who I was like – reluctant and struggling readers – by writing books for them!

[for some great articles on education, check out Anne Murphy Paul’s site. She has a gift for making these issues easy to understand, plus she shares a lot of great resources.]

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 other ways to make it through third grade:

  1. Practice saying “TAG-YOU’RE-IT-NO-BACKS!” faster than anyone else.
  2. For bullies: Anger management; for their victims: Karate lessons
  3. Two words – Cootie Repellent
Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller described as “unputdownable” and “will draw in even the most reluctant readers”:
THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI: Book I of the thrilling Delphi Trilogy

A lone teen. A suspicious death. An ancient conspiracy.

Read it now – before the October 2013 release of
Book II: THE DELPHI DECEPTION

Related articles

Categories: Books, Libraries, Readers, Reluctant Readers, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Free Kindle Ebook – The League of Delphi

Grab a piece of dark conspiracy that you won’t want to put down!

Free for Kindle July 14-18

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy is FREE on Kindle until Thursday.

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy is FREE on Kindle until Thursday.

Hey Kindle users, grab a thrilling read to go – for FREE.

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI: Book I of The Delphi Trilogy is free on Kindle Sunday-Thursday!

Readers say they can’t put it down, so pick it up and fall into a dark conspiracy that will keep you turning the pages until the end.

Read it now in advance of Book II’s October release.

Here’s what readers are saying about THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI:

  • “Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”
  • “It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense … and very well-written characters.”
  • “From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”
Read it now – before the October 2013 release of Book II, THE DELPHI DECEPTION!
.
Why would a boy who escaped the clutches of a killer conspiracy return to the most dangerous place on earth? Find out in …
THE SHADOW OF DELPHI
A Short Delphi Trilogy Prequel

 A teen’s funeral. An ominous encounter. A fateful decision.

Also AVAILABLE NOW on Kindle – only 99 cents!
The Shadow of Delphi cover-web

Follow author Chris Everheart on Facebook to get updates on books and events!

Categories: Ancient Greece, Books, Libraries, My Books, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Announcing: The Delphi Deception

Book II of the thrilling Delphi Trilogy

Available October 2013!

THE DEPHI DECEPTION: Book II of the thrilling Delphi Trilogy will be available October, 2013!

THE DEPHI DECEPTION: Book II of the thrilling Delphi Trilogy will be available October, 2013!

A desperate teen, a dangerous alliance, an ancient foe.

The gripping Delphi Trilogy continues with Book II, THE DELPHI DECEPTION, plunging you deeper into a dark world of conspiracy and danger.

After ten years in hiding 17-year-old Zach made the mistake of returning to his wealthy hometown. He slammed head-on into the conspiracy that killed his parents, drove a childhood friend to suicide, and exploits other teens to fulfill an ancient agenda of greed. Zach should have run. But he stayed, and now the consequences are burying him.

His blind pursuit of the town’s deepest secrets has left him injured and terrified. The answers he’s gotten about his true identity are more disturbing than he could have imagined. And his first love, Ashley, is in more danger than ever.

Desperate to save Ashley, Zach is deterred by the mysterious man he thought was his ally. Forced to team with Ashley’s ambitious sister who’s willing to help—for a price—he enters an alliance fraught with deception and betrayal.

As the League of Delphi’s vicious new security chief closes in on him, Zach is propelled back into the jaws of danger by a cryptic command from beyond this world. Will his misguided mission save Ashley? Or will it get them both killed?

THE DELPHI DECEPTION promises to deliver the same page-turning thrills and suspense that teens and adults alike are loving about The League of Delphi:

  • “Read. This. Book! Each chapter leaves you on the edge of your seat, and it all leads up to one of the most exciting endings I’ve read in a long time.”
  • “It has it all: romance, intrigue and suspense … and very well-written characters.”
  • “From the very first page to the very last page I felt like I was on this wild ride.”
Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller
THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI: Book I of the thrilling Delphi Trilogy
A lone teen. A suspicious death. An ancient conspiracy.
Read it now – before the October 2013 release of Book II, THE DELPHI DECEPTION!

Follow author Chris Everheart on Facebook to get updates on books and events!

Categories: Ancient Greece, Books, Libraries, My Books, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Illegally Teen

The puzzling theme in current YA literature – IT’S ILLEGAL TO BE A TEEN!

In a world

In a world hostile to hopes, dreams, and expectations, teen-hood seems “illegal.”

Sparked by an article in the Los Angeles Review of Books – “YA Fiction and the End of Boys,” where Sarah Mesle identifies what I call a “manhood deficit” in modern YA literature, I noted in my post “The Beginning of the End of Adulthood” a few weeks ago that when it comes to identity for boys and girls alike, it’s simply a terrible time to be a teen. But it’s bigger than that.

You don’t have to look too deep into modern youth books to see that teens face a world that is unsupportive at best and often downright hostile. YA protagonists are faced with absent, ineffectual, or harmful parents and adults, daily life in the margins, a society organized against their future wellbeing, and authority figures seeking to snuff out their spirits and their lives.

I can sum up the current literary sentiment toward teen identity with one word – “Illegal”.

The Hunger Games tournament punishes teens just for being.

The Hunger Games tournament punishes teens just for being.

Deborah Davis’ drama NOT LIKE YOU is a good example of this ethos for girls, with a disturbed mother whose chaos blocks teen Kayla from finding her identity. And in the action/adventure THE HUNGER GAMES, does Katniss Everdeen have any real chance of realizing “womanhood” in a society where every year she has to face the prospect of dying by lottery?

A teen can legally be taken apart in UNWIND by Neil Schusterman.

A teen can legally be taken apart in UNWIND by Neil Schusterman.

Boys have it just as bad. In my latest book THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI, 17-year-old Zach sneaks back into his hometown and battles a secret government that killed his parents to find out who he really is. And it gets worse! In UNWIND by Neil Schusterman, 17-year-old Connor fights to save himself from being legally “retroactively aborted” by his parents who find his teen rebellion to be too much trouble.

To be fair, this theme is a good, solid literary device. I once heard Anthony Horowitz – bestselling author of action/adventure/thriller books for boys – tell a group of kids, “If you want the young characters in a book to have an adventure the first thing you have to do is get rid of the parents.” So, yes, absent/ineffectual parents and hostile adults are fertile ground for stories where kids need to fight their own battles and overcome obstacles to grow.

But it’s not all fiction. Teens looking toward adulthood in today’s Western society see an insecure economy, a scarcity of good-paying jobs that offer personal independence, a culture in the middle of re-identifying the meaning of “family” and gender identities (the uncertainty is troubling, not the redefinition), adults fomenting war, environmental disaster, and a 24-hour bad-news cycle.

Teens can’t feel safe and strive for a positive adult identity in a world so toxic and insecure that it’s practically illegal to have hopes, dreams, and expectations. Trust in society? Gender roles? Womanhood? Manhood? None of it matters when it looks like there’s no future. This is the low-grade strain and confusion that today’s teens live with and it’s reflected in the stories written by and for them.

I suspect and so hope that amidst an atmosphere that today may feel gloomy and oppressive, our teens are redefining a positive adulthood for themselves and future generations. Making teen-hood “illegal” creates the rebels – the self-determined heroes – we need to do it.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 positive things about teen-hood being “illegal”:

  1. Every grownup can now say, “Yep, I was baaaad once.”
  2. Free jumpsuits, free bracelets, free anklets for everyone between 13 and 19!
  3. Rebels not expected to have a cause – saves hassle for everyone.
Chris Everheart is author of the thriller
THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Read my new author interview at Chompasaurus!
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The Beginning of the End of Adulthood

Is there really a “manhood deficit” in today’s YA literature?

This kid’s still smiling. Apparently he doesn’t know that life is all bad news after 17.

Given my focus on boys’ reading I couldn’t pass by “YA Fiction and the End of Boys”  by Sarah Meslein in the Los Angeles Review of Books. It’s a hot hot hot! topic that won’t go away anytime soon.

She suggests that there’s a “manhood deficit” (my phrase, not hers) in YA literature that abandons teen boys to an identity crisis that didn’t exist for the young males of nineteenth-century literature. Back then they had a strong sense of what it meant to become a man.

She’s right-on about teen boys’ confusion over adulthood. But I don’t think the issue is gender-specific, somehow leaving boys more confused about manhood than girls are about womanhood. I see it more as an ongoing generation gap that teens have been inheriting since the late 1960’s. And it plugs into a theme I’ve noticed in YA literature – when it comes to identity, it’s simply a terrible time to be a teen.

1969. It starts.

Adults – the supposed role models – have nurtured a world of unrest and insecurity for the last two generations, all the while chanting the deceptively self-serving slogan, “For the children.” Think maybe there’s a reason today’s teens aren’t striving to identify with adult roles?

There is definitely an adulthood gap showing up in today’s booming YA literature category. Teens are by nature at least a little rebellious – or completely rebellious in certain ways – needing to separate their identities from adults in order to explore who they are and who they are becoming. That’s one part of the issue – it’s an overall teen endeavor, one of the many luxuries of our modern times.

But it seems there are many societal issues, too, pushing teens farther away from adult roles and identities, causing an overall “adulthood aversion.” In a time when gender is more equally valued than any other we know of, teens need look no further than their 200 cable TV channels to see how equally idiotic adults can be.

If there’s any pop-culture evidence outside of YA literature for strong examples of “manhood” and “womanhood” I’d like to see it – and I think teens would too. They’ve been missing far too long.

How could such a vision of one’s future NOT show up in YA literature?

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 other reasons teens aren’t exited about their upcoming roles as adults:

  1. Divided government makes it impossible to legislate fun.
  2. Tension caused by constant state of war causes Irritable Bowel Disorder, destroys claim, “I’ll never be like my parents.”
  3. Jer-ry! Jer-ry! Jer-ry!
Chris Everheart is author of the thriller
THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Read my new author interview at Chompasaurus!
Categories: Books, Uncategorized, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Spread the Conspiracy: Read

A manifesto for a new secret movement.

Inside every book characters conspire to change their world. [The Reading Conspiracy tagline and logo are available for free use.]

There’s a secret world beneath the surface of everyday life. Deep in this underground realm, people of all types meet for common purposes, negotiate relationships, confront darkness and deceit, struggle to overcome limitations, find love amidst chaos, plan to overthrow tyranny, face overwhelming challenges, and take action great and small. It’s a training ground for the mind, a launching pad for the spirit, a society with rituals, codes, and role models all its own. The secret world is: Reading.

We need fresh recruits to adopt the vision, pass the word, spread the conspiracy. Who are the best candidates? Teens.

Why do we want teens to be the future of this bold movement? Because adventuring in the world below the surface changes the way people view, react to, and act in the world above. Developing a love of reading while young is a guarantee that information, enjoyment, and inspiration can be easily accessed and spread throughout life for the development of one’s self, one’s society, and one’s world. It puts the power into the hands of the coconspirator.

That’s the theme of this weekend’s TeenLitFest: Spread the Conspiracy: Read. I am partnering on the event with the youth librarians at the Johnson City Public Library. Yellow Rocket Media created the theme, tagline, and logo for the event and for continued use by any library school or reading group who wants to use it. As the feature event of the day, we’re holding the official book release party for THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI, selling and signing books as a fundraiser for the teen and ‘tween book clubs.

Reading provides a meeting place within the mind, a forum  with a unique combination of privacy, intimacy, wisdom, and connection where people of all walks of life can:

  • Explore and discover within the privacy of their mind
  • Think freely and critically
  • Strengthen their personal characteristics
  • Access the information and wisdom of the ages
  • Gain inspiration
  • Access passion and develop the soul
  • Learn courage
  • Decide to take action

Englishman Sir Richard Burton explored the hidden world and wrote about it in the Nineteenth Century.

We learn and gain inspiration from those who have done what we want to do, who have gone before us and sent messages back. Unlike other conspiracies, the reading conspiracy is not about defining agendas for others and determining outcomes. It’s about giving teens the tools to explore their options and access the basic, subtle resources they need to develop their dreams and accomplish their plans.

This conspiracy has the broadest membership of any the world has ever seen – the entire world of teens with curious minds and determined hearts. So, all young readers are invited to … Spread the Conspiracy: Read.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 other reasons to learn to love reading:

  1. Eventually you’ll want to know what’s in that Cap’n Crunch you’ve been eating your whole life.
  2. Believe it or not, graffiti artists are sometimes trying to tell you something – with words.
  3. If our country ever really does go all “Hunger Games” you’ll be the one person able to read the old, dried up newspapers insulating the walls of your shack to figure out how it got that way.
Chris Everheart is author of the thriller
THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Learn more about what makes this writer tick. Read my author interview at PaperBackSwap.com!
Categories: Books, Libraries, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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