Posts Tagged With: prophecy

Goats to Gods: The Delphi Legacy

How a goatherder’s pasture became the center of the world for over 1,000 years.

(Re-post in celebration of my latest author interview at B.L. Kosiner’s Book Blog – Enjoy!)

Model of the temple mount at Delphi, Temple of Apollo top. -Lonely Planet

A crack in a mountainside 100 miles from Athens influenced the ancient Mediterranean world for an entire age. The holy city of Delphi was home to sacred temples, wealthy treasuries, renowned theaters, and active sporting arenas that marked it as the most important cultural, religious and financial hub in the Western world.

The mother of Delphi’s influence was a fissure in the rock breathing a mind-altering vapor, discovered by a goatherder around 1400 BCE. As the ancient mind went, this was obviously a portal into the divine dimension. The spot was considered the navel of the world and a sacred site grew up around it, eventually inspiring a huge Temple of Apollo to awe its visitors.

Priestess of Delphi -John Collier, 1891

Ensconced on a tripod seat over the fissure in the temple’s hallowed chamber, the entranced oracle – called the Pythia – became the conduit for the god Apollo, who would deliver for seekers vague personal messages to be interpreted by the attendant priests. The prophecies covered every human interest from romance to finance to empires.

The oracles were famously, even cruelly, cryptic. In the most infamous military blunder of all time Lydian king Croesus consulted the Oracle before invading Persia and was assured that a great empire would be destroyed if he did. Imagine his surprise when he lost the war he started and it was his empire that was destroyed!

Aegeus Consults the Pythia -ancienthistory.about.com

Among the many seers and oracles of the ancient world, none wielded the power and respect of Delphi. For more than a millennium kings, aristocrats, commoners and colonists paid dearly for a precognitive utterance from the Pythia that would give them some warning, guidance or blessing for their next endeavor.

Delphi’s influence eventually waned and it was shut down by Christian Rome in the 4th Century CE. But the mark of Delphi on our civilization is an undeniable hint at our magical, mythical and humble past.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger

3 oracles from Delphi we wish we hadn’t followed:

  1. “Gerard Butler and the cast of 300 shall go into battle shirtless.”
  2. “The great vessel Titanic is indestructible – you shall turn off the radio and sail it anywhere.”
  3. “You shall have a new queen and she shall be named ‘Snooki!'”
Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller
THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
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Categories: Ancient Greece, Ancient Secrets, archaeology, Hidden Archealogy, My Books, The Ancient World, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Books: The New Old-fangled Thing

Digitization of Europe’s oldest book sparks medieval future shock.

St. Cuthbert’s Gospel – 7th century CE -British Library

When we released my new thriller “The League of Delphi” on Kindle Monday, I remembered a fascinating book-related NPR news story from this spring that got me contemplating the “evolution” of the book in the digital world.

In April, the British Library in London acquired a pocket-sized book with a hand-tooled, red leather cover and clean, creamy inside pages in like-new condition. The book – a hand-scribed Gospel of St. John entombed with British cleric St. Cuthbert – cost £9 million (US$14 million) and is over 1,300 years old.

St Cuthbert’s Gospel inner page -Daily Mail UK

Books are fragile artifacts. Few survive centuries of weathering and relocation intact. Unlike the collection preserved in the world’s oldest continually operating library at Saint Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt, where arid conditions aid naturally in the preservation of books and scrolls, Europe’s climate is rather hostile to books and manuscripts. This is what makes the so-called St. Cuthbert’s Gospel so special – it is the oldest intact book known to have been produced in Europe.

Another notoriously hostile element to books: fire. One reason that St. Cuthbert’s Gospel survived was that the monks at his shrine on the isle of Lindesfarne removed the coffin from its original tomb in the 9th century and fled the marauding Viking invaders known to pillage and burn everything in their path.

Marauding Vikings pillaged and burned many of England’s landmarks in Medieval times. -Cracked.com

The coffin traveled northern England until it finally settled at Durham Cathedral, where it was opened in 1104 and the book was discovered “at the head of our blessed father Cuthbert lying in his tomb.”

On loan from the Jesuits of England since 1979, the main motives for finally raising the money to purchase the gospel were preserving it and sharing it with the world. The Library wasted no time digitizing the book and posting it to their online archives where anyone with an Internet connection can see it.

YA thriller The League of Delphi by Chris Everheart “A lone teen, a suspicious death, an ancient conspiracy.” Now on Kindle

Will St. Cuthbert’s Gospel crack Amazon Kindle’s top 100 downloads? Probably not. But in a world where some insiders are anticipating that 80% of books may be digital by the year 2020, the idea of digitizing a 1,300 year old book to share it with the world is … um … ahead of its time?

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 unconfirmed details about Europe’s oldest book:

  1. A phone number found scribbled on one of the pages is only 3 digits long.
  2. It’s written in an archaic language that no one seems to know anymore called English.
  3. Early reviews were terrible, but sales picked up after the movie came out.

Chris Everheart is author of the thriller

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Categories: Ancient Secrets, archaeology, Hidden Archealogy, History, My Books, The Ancient World, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Fault-y Prophet

5 facts behind the mythical, mystical power of the Oracle at Delphi stack up for today’s Burger Bite.

Postcard showing (clockwise) the Treasury of the Athenians, the Theatre and the Tholos. -unescards.blogspot.com

  1. After a century of debate, scientists in the 1980s confirmed ancient accounts of two converging fault lines in the hydrocarbon-rich limestone beneath Delphi capable of releasing ethylene gas that could explain the trance-like states of the Pythia (the Delphic oracle).
  2. While ethylene gas, first used as a surgical anesthetic in the 1920s, is capable of inducing unconsciousness, altered states, or incoherent speech, the side effects can be horrific – including crippling seizures and death.
  3. Due to the hazards of their duty, the Pythias observed painstaking rituals of fasting and preparation prior to delivering oracles only on the seventh day of the nine warm months of the year.
  4. The often-long journey to Delphi, the ritualized preparation for inquiry, and the sparse ceremonial schedule held the supplicants at the Oracle for extended periods, giving the Delphic priests ample time to gather intelligence that could be used in the interpretation of their prophecies.
  5. Because Delphi was the most important cultural, religious and financial hub in the ancient Mediterranean, it’s been suggested that the “interpretation” of the nonsensical oracles was simply an astute analysis of history, current events, and human interest by the well-informed attending priests.

Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Categories: Ancient Greece, Ancient Secrets, archaeology, Hidden Archealogy, My Books, The Ancient World, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ancient Future Shock

The modern truth behind the ancient power of the Oracle at Delphi.

“Sanity, itself, thus hinges on man’s ability to predict his immediate, personal future on the basis of information fed him by the environment.” –Alvin Toffler, Future Shock

The Pythia delivers oracles from the Adyton deep inside the Temple of Apollo at Delphi.

Statistician, market researcher, trend analyst, political wonk. These modern occupations were all summed up in one ancient role – the Oracle. For over 1,000 years a woman called the Pythia at Delphi, Greece influenced the Western world with a wisp of vapor and a whisper of mystery – and not without merit.

The many oracles of the ancient world  have long been considered myths or just clever ruses to separate  superstitious people from their money. But in recent years, archaeologists and geologists have discovered features at Delphi that may explain the unique behavior of the Pythia, the Delphic Oracle’s top ranking, and its dominance over an entire culture.

Map of the fault lines beneath the Delphi site.

The Temple of Apollo at Delphi, it turns out, stands on two converging fault lines where water from the sacred Castalian spring may have mixed with natural substances in the layers of limestone beneath, producing anesthetic gases like ethylene in ancient times. Exposing herself to the vapors, the Pythia would experience a semi-conscious, trance-like state where she was given to alarming convulsions and nonsensical babbling.

The strain and danger of the job prompted the sisterhood of the Pythia to implement painstaking rituals of fasting and preparation before performing their duty only on the seventh day of the month.

This leisurely schedule had two valuable benefits for the institution of the Oracle: 1) it limited the supply and increased the value/demand/price of prophecies; and 2) it gave the priests time to gather intelligence from the visiting supplicants while they waited at Delphi for the ceremonial day. It’s been suggested that the Delphic priests’ extensive knowledge of politics, finance, society and current events was the true source of the “interpreted” oracles.

Achilles consulting Pythia – Sheila Terry/Science Photo Library

Whatever its source, the Oracle at Delphi was universally accepted as the fount of wisdom for Greek-influenced culture around the known world. Everyone from commoners to kings sought prophecies from the lips of the Pythia, her golden age bookmarked by centuries of service from 1400BCE well into the Roman era.

After a steady loss of influence – possibly due to the closing of the vapor-producing fault – several barbarian invasions, and looting by occupying states, the oracle was at last silenced in the 4th Century CE by Roman emperor Theodosius I, who had it demolished and left to ruins. The site was covered by successive landslides from Mount Parnassus then built over by a small village until it was rediscovered by French archaeologists in the late-1800’s.

While the Pythia no longer speaks from the Temple of Apollo, the amazing grandeur of the Delphi site still speaks of a time when magic and mystery ruled the world and the future – from the decisions of kings to the concerns of the common people.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger.

3 non-scientific non-facts about the Oracle at Delphi:

  1. John Lennon wrote “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” about the Pythia.
  2. Site of Greek-a-palooza -436 BCE. T-shirts are still available.
  3. The Oracle charged a Quarter-Dracma via a coin slot in the Temple of Apollo’s door.

Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Categories: Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, Ancient Secrets, archaeology, Hidden Archealogy, My Books, The Ancient World, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

5 Oddities of the Oracle at Delphi

The Tholos at Delphi -Matt Barrett greecetravel.com

Here’s a Burger Bite of 5 things that made Delphi such a mysterious and hypnotic place that cast an undeniable spell on Western Civilization over 1,000 years:

  1. At Delphi, the oracle was called the Pythia — named for the Python, a serpent whose rotting carcass was considered the source of a mind-altering vapor emitted there after being slain by the god Apollo.
  2. The Pythia sat and delivered her cryptic oracles on a tripod seat over the crack in the rock where the toxic mist – called pneuma – leaked out.
  3. The oracle only dispensed prophecies on the seventh day of each of the nine warm months of the year, when Apollo was believed to dwell there.
  4. Because of its mystical features, Delphi was designated the “omphalos” (navel of the world) and influenced Western civilization for over 1,000 years.
  5. Before recorded history and the reign of the Pythia, a legendary prophetess called the Sibyl is said to have dispensed oracles from a rock at the site of the omphalos after the fabled Trojan War.

Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Categories: Ancient Greece, Ancient Secrets, archaeology, Hidden Archealogy, My Books, The Ancient World, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Delphi: Goats to Gods

How a goatherder’s pasture became the center of the world for over 1,000 years.

Model of the temple mount at Delphi, Temple of Apollo top. -Lonely Planet

A crack in a mountainside 100 miles from Athens influenced the ancient Mediterranean world for an entire age. The holy city of Delphi was home to sacred temples, wealthy treasuries, renowned theaters, and active sporting arenas that marked it as the most important cultural, religious and financial hub in the Western world.

The mother of Delphi’s influence was a fissure in the rock breathing a mind-altering vapor, discovered by a goatherder around 1400 BCE. As the ancient mind went, this was obviously a portal into the divine dimension. The spot was considered the navel of the world and a sacred site grew up around it, eventually inspiring a huge Temple of Apollo to awe its visitors.

Priestess of Delphi -John Collier, 1891

Ensconced on a tripod seat over the fissure in the temple’s hallowed chamber, the entranced oracle – called the Pythia – became the conduit for the god Apollo, who would deliver for seekers vague personal messages to be interpreted by the attendant priests. The prophecies covered every human interest from romance to finance to empires.

The oracles were famously, even cruelly, cryptic. In the most infamous military blunder of all time Lydian king Croesus consulted the Oracle before invading Persia and was assured that a great empire would be destroyed if he did. Imagine his surprise when he lost the war he started and it was his empire that was destroyed!

Aegeus Consults the Pythia -ancienthistory.about.com

Among the many seers and oracles of the ancient world, none wielded the power and respect of Delphi. For more than a millennium kings, aristocrats, commoners and colonists paid dearly for a precognitive utterance from the Pythia that would give them some warning, guidance or blessing for their next endeavor.

Delphi’s influence eventually waned and it was shut down by Christian Rome in the 4th Century CE. But the mark of Delphi on our civilization is an undeniable hint at our magical, mythical and humble past.

Now, here’s the cheese on this Brain Burger

3 oracles from Delphi we wish we hadn’t followed:

  1. “Gerard Butler and the cast of 300 shall go into battle shirtless.”
  2. “The great vessel Titanic is indestructible – you shall turn off the radio and sail it anywhere.”
  3. “You shall have a new queen and she shall be named ‘Snooki!'”

Chris Everheart is author of the YA thriller

THE LEAGUE OF DELPHI

Available Now
Categories: Ancient Greece, Ancient Secrets, archaeology, Hidden Archealogy, My Books, The Ancient World, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

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